CURSILLO

 Movement

CHUVINA

Hung Andy Van Chu

Vietnamese INorth America

Vài Điển Chính Của Bài

ON THE OUTSIDE LOOKING IN

(Bài thuyết trình của văn-hữu Chu Văn Hùng với Cộng Đồng Mỹ Đen, do tổ chức Vision Leadership Foundation mời nhiều lần, trong nhiều năm qua)


"Hầu hết các ý tưởng và giải pháp (tôi trình bầy hôm nay) đã đến từ Người Mỹ Trắng hay Người Mỹ Đen, không đến từ “Người Mỹ Khác.”  Tôi là “Người Mỹ Khác”, Người Mỹ Gốc Việt mới; một người bên ngoài nhìn vào những vấn nạn cũ ở bên trong (Cộng Đồng Mỹ Đen ).” - “Most of these ideas and solutions come from either Black or White, not from the "Other."  I am the “Other” – a new Vietnamese American – from an outsider looking in at an old problem.” Andy Van Chu.

"Bất kể tín ngưỡng, chủng tộc, màu da, hay nguồn gốc quốc gia, chúng ta phải đặt sang một bên những khác biệt để cùng nhau đối diện với tương lai của đất nước chúng ta.  Chúng ta phải tự đoàn kết trong sức mạnh và chuẩn bị để chống lại sự căng thẳng xã hội và sự xung đột ý thức hệ nguy hiểm.  Nếu không làm như vậy thì, niềm vui của chúng ta sẽ thành rác bụi, và những giấc mơ của chúng ta cháy tan thành tro tàn." - “Regardless of creed, race, color, or national origin, we must set aside our differences and face our nation's future together.  We must unite in strength and prepare ourselves to resist social tensions and dangerous ideological conflicts; otherwise, our joy would melt into dust, and our dreams dissolve into ashes.” Andy Van Chu.

"Không phải những gì tôi nói (hôm nay) là hoàn toàn mới.  (Sự thực) những gì tôi đưa ra thảo luận (hôm nay) đã từng được thảo luận trước đây, nhưng vì sao chúng ta vẫn không nhìn thấy sự thay đổi nhiều trong cộng đồng chúng ta. (Có lẽ vì) những kế hoạch của chúng ta còn thiếu một yếu tố quan trọng là LÒNG TIN CẬY NƠI ĐẤNG TỐI CAO." - “Nothing I have said is completely new.  What I have discussed has been discussed before me, yet we have not seen our communities change much. The missing ingredient from our plans is FAITH.” 

Andy Van Chu

 ON THE OUTSIDE LOOKING IN
(Andy Van Chu speaks to the Vision Leadership Foundation)

Housing Secretary Ben Carson

Clarifies Comment that

Poverty Is A 'State of Mind'

June 5, 20175:00 AM ET

BY PAM FESSLER


Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson drew controversy last month when he said in a radio interview that "poverty to a large extent is also a state of mind."
















Dr. Ben Carson is standing by his controversial comment that poverty is a "state of mind," but he says that "how a person thinks" is only one component that contributes to being poor.

"What I said is that it is a factor. A part of poverty can be the state of mind," he told NPR in an interview. "People tend to approach things differently, based on their frame of mind."

His agency, he says, wants "to find ways to make sure that people understand that the person who has the most to do with what happens to you, is you."

Carson, who grew up in poverty, said in a Sirius XM radio interview last month that "poverty to a large extent is also a state of mind." The comment drew widespread criticism from anti-poverty advocates who say it implies that poor Americans are at fault for their poverty and that they're better off without government aid.


No dream equals no vision.  No vision means no direction.  The problem is right here in front of us.  We have no time to look at the past, or to blame the government, to blame our Civil Rights Leaders or to blame anyone else.  We must dream our best dream (even the small dream) and then work hard to make that dream come true.

What is our dream today?  Simply stated, "To improve the quality of life."  How can we do that?  Let us look at our present situation.  After the "March on Washington," more Blacks as elected officials in public office, and as civil rights leaders.  Has this changed the quality of life for many of those who live in the inner city? Who lives in this housing project?

 "What I receive I must pass on to others," quoting from Elie Wiesel, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986, is the principle that governs my life.  I must pay back to the community what God and this Country has given to my children and me.  That is the reason I am here today, and why I will be with you on any project, at any time, anywhere my assistance is needed.

In this section, I tried to bring up only the principal of each program.  In a next section, feel free to challenge the ideas above or ask for clarification. I’m always up for a good community-themed discussion.  And in future, if you are interested in the details to implement any of the Care Programs, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Thank you.  May God bless us all. 
Hung “Andy” Van Chu

How do we get out of the trap?  I would like to share with you a program to move oneself up.  I call this program, SixCare: Family Care, Education Care, Neighbor Care, Community Care, Business Care, and finally Job Care.

Family Care:  There is a significant difference between the family structure that exists in the United States and Vietnam.  I feel that if each father would take a little more responsibility for his family and each mother would spend a little more time looking after her children; the community would be much better.  I would hope that the religious leaders would speak out more about family values in the church; that the teachers would speak up about family values in the classroom; and that the parents must sacrifice their personal lives to build strong families--the foundation of society.

Education Care:  Each parent must be involved in the educational training of their children.  Even if the parents are not educated, they can still help to motivate their children to learn.  In the deep south of Louisiana, much Vietnamese are fishermen, some of them can not write Vietnamese either, but their children are doing very well in schools.  Too often the family depends upon a school system that is governed by politicians, not educators; and sometimes, the money spent on administration, not in the classroom where it counts.

The simple fact is:  (1) Our community is not going to make the social and economic progress we desire unless each of us shares a satisfactory education.  (2) Our community cannot change unless we invest directly in the future of our children, from the first day they enter a pre-kindergarten school until the day they emerge from college into the real world.

I would like to share with you one of the secrets in the Asian's education procedure:  "The children learn how to respect the teachers before their parents send them to school.  The teachers educate the students in how to respect their parents before sending them back to their home.  And, both parent and teacher train the children in how to become a good person before teaching the other subjects".

Neighbor Care:  The first line of defense against crime is us.  We need to fully cooperate with law enforcement, so that together we may keep the drugs, violence, and crime out of our neighborhoods.  If we work with law enforcement, we significantly diminish the dangers they face each day, as well as create new friendships and alliances.  This way would culminate in the reduction, if not the elimination of, the abuse of power by the police.

Community Care:  The inner city community needs to develop and train leaders to address the concerns of the neighborhood today and tomorrow.  The community's goal should be to move five percent of the people out of the housing projects every year and to get five percent of the people off of welfare and food stamps every year.  After twenty years, the picture of the Black community will be wonderful indeed.  To reach our new "5% goal", each person and each family in the community will try to do five percent better each month or at least each year.  Without setting a community goal, it is hard to measure our movement, and it is difficult to succeed.

Business Care:  We need to bring our resources together to build Inner City businesses with our neighborhoods.  We need to be able to take advantage of government opportunities to establish small businesses.  We should continue to talk to the Small Business Administration and convince them to reduce their restrictions on "Equity And Experience."  Both government and Black Citizens must take a risk to make the change to something better.  The benefits from the new businesses would stay in the community, helping the community to improve education, the quality of life and to create more businesses.

Job Care:  Maximize training by the government in jobs that are available in our area, both today and tomorrow.  We must not waste time being trained for jobs that are not there.  Set up small community training classes, using volunteer instructors for volunteer students.  The Black professional needs to return what they received by donating a little of his time or money to the community training project.

Ladies and Gentlemen:

Nothing I have said is completely new.  What I have discussed has been discussed before me, yet we have not seen our communities change much.  The missing ingredient from our plans is FAITH.
                                   
Care without Faith is Impossible
                         Faith without Care is Unacceptable


The religious and community leaders must support each other and work closer together to lead our community in the right direction.  Although the road is difficult to travel, we MUST, for the benefit of the generations to come, care for each other.  Regardless of creed, race, color, or national origin, we must set aside our differences and face our nation's future together.  We must unite in strength and prepare ourselves to resist social tensions and dangerous ideological conflicts; otherwise, our joy would melt into dust, and our dreams dissolve into ashes.

We must learn to live and work together to improve our quality of life and move our country in the right direction.

In response to the Los Angeles riots, General Colin Powell told the nation on television:  "Too many Blacks are still trapped in a cycle where poverty, violence, drugs, bad housing, inadequate education, lack of jobs and loss of faith combine to create a sad human condition."  What is this, "trapped?"  What are traps?  The traps are Welfare, Food Stamps, and Housing Projects.  Many of you will not agree with me on this point.  Let me explain.

Under our current capitalistic system, these programs are needed, but they may also serve as "capitalistic traps."  They were designed to help the poor to get out of the "poverty river."  However, in many cases, when we become comfortable with these programs, this river will float us on into the "poverty ocean" where we drown.  I am sure that you would agree that it is now a trap.

Ladies and Gentlemen:

What has become of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s dreams?  What are your dreams?   After the Los Angeles riots, I asked these questions to some Afro-Americans here in New Orleans.  A nice looking sixteen-year-old girl asked me, "Who is Martin Luther King?"  An eighteen-year-old boy inquired, "What is his dream?"  Most of the answers were basically, "I know what Civil Rights are, but his other dreams I do not know."

It is a great honor for me to be invited here, to share my feelings with you about life in our Inner City.  Each and every day through television, radio, and newspapers, important people, including government officials and civil rights leaders, point out problems to each of us and tell us that we must fix out Inner City.  Most of these ideas and solutions come from either Black or White, not from the "Other."  I am the Others – a new Vietnamese American – from an outsider looking in at an old problem.  I hope that my speech today will bring you some different thoughts and will contribute something new to your thinking, your visions, your plans, and your actions.